About Peter Walsh - Agent

A chemical engineer by education, Peter’s background includes a tenure at IBM, followed by migration to Wall Street where he repackaged over $1 billion in various tax exempt assets and other activities for financial institutions.

Peter has been licensed for 10 years, having specialized in restaurant activity of all types, sizes and locations. His prior experience enhances his skills to locate, analyze and evaluate opportunities found in the Northeast, complementing the diverse experience of Lyman.

With the southeastern Connecticut commercial real estate market showing hopeful signs of activity, he brings to a customer the creative thinking that can “get the deal done.”

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Lyman Guide

Ways to Financially Analyze a Commercial Real Estate Investment

Commercial real estate (CRE) is a numbers game

So, financial analysis is the foundation for making informed commercial real estate decisions

  • Helps you evaluate financial performance, investment return, property values
  • Helps you arrive at the value of a purchase, compare purchase options

Key measures

  • Net operating income (NOI)
    • NOI = gross income — operating expenses
    • Lenders use this to determine the maximum loan amount they’ll approve
  • Debt-service-coverage ratio (DSCR)
    • DSCR = NOI / annual debt service
    • Tells you the cash flow available to service the property’s debt
    • DSCR of 1.25 or higher normally adequate for a CRE investment
  • Capitalization rate (cap rate)
    • Cap rate = NOI / property’s market value
    • Used to determine the rate of return expected on an investment property
    • Can also calculate a property’s value based on a desired rate of return, using the following formula:
      • Property value = NOI / cap rate
    • Useful for comparing the relative values of alternative CRE investments
    • Higher cap rate generally indicates a higher return, but also, typically, a higher risk
  • Return on Investment (ROI)
    • REI = NOI / amount invested
    • The higher the ROI, the better the investment
  • Cash-on-cash return (CoC)
    • CoC = annual pretax cash flow / total cash invested
    • The higher the CoC return, the better the investment